Personally, I’m a big succulent fan, mainly aloe. Not just because I am lazy, umm I mean an environmentalist, and don’t like to water much but because they look cool. Some grow like a tree but most are like a big beautiful bush or smaller, almost like a ground cover if you plan enough. It was good to see this article in the U-T recently…

“Succulents make dramatic statements in landscapes large or small and also in container gardens,” she said. “What I hadn’t realized is that they can also produce dramatic flowers.”

And they’re practical to use because they require little water once established and low maintenance. Although not completely fireproof, they are more fire-resistant than most plants because of their high water content.

Succulents are defined as any plant storing water in leaves, stems or roots to withstand drought. Cactuses are succulents, but botanists set them apart in their own category of Cactaceae. Botanists have categorized succulent plants into many different genera. The most widely used in home gardens are aloes, agaves, aeoniums, kalanchoe, sedums, echeveria, euphorbia and crassula. Within each genus are species and varieties, some man-made through hybridization.

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