A Solana Beach homeowner won permission from the state Coastal Commission to inject concrete into a cave under a bluff supporting the property, but only after the agency agreed with concessions suggested by the San Diego Chapter of Surfrider. The Surfrider Foundation has long argued that so-called seacave fills act much like seawalls. This particular property had a deed restriction prohibiting construction of a  seawall.

The Bannasch Family Trust obtained approval to place “erodible” concrete into  seacaves below its property in northern Solana Beach. However, the commission listened to Surfrider’s criticism that the concrete may not erode at the same rate as the natural sandstone bluff, leaving concrete protrusions obstructing the public beach.

As a result, the homeowner must prove the concrete will in fact erode before it can fill the seacave, a long notch in the bottom of the bluff carved by wave action.  If the homeowner can’t prove the cement will erode, they can’t install it. And if the cave is filled, the homeowner agreed to remove the concrete if and when it sticks out more than 6 inches from the natural bluff.